Hyponatremia and Central Pontine Myelinolysis

What is hyponatremia? Information regarding CPM and EPM.

A large number of case reports regarding CPM/EPM:

This post is going to list a website that I found regarding dozens of case reports regarding CPM/EPM.

I was really surprised that these case reports, though brief, do correlate to many of my previous descriptions of symptoms associated with CPM/EPM. I do not know where these case reports were cited from, and I wish that there were more detailed accounts, but we have to work with what we have. The following information comes from this link: http://www.lookfordiagnosis.com/cases.php?term=Myelinolysis%2C+Central+Pontine&lang=1&from=10

11/105. immunoglobulins are effective in pontine myelinolysis.

Although the exact pathogenesis of central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) is unknown, correction of hyponatremia, thyreotropin releasing hormone, plasmapheresis, and corticosteroids seem to be effective. Assuming intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) to also be effective in CPM, 0.4 g/kg body weight/d immunoglobulins were applied to a 48-year-old patient who developed CPM with double visiondysarthria, dysphagia, and left-sided hemiparesis 3 weeks after spontaneous normalization of hyponatremia. After 5 days of IVIG, his symptoms markedly improved, confirmed by improvement in the Norris score (42%), Frenchay score (19%), Kurtzke score (20%), Disability score (54%), vital capacity(26%), and peak torque (69%). The promising clinical effect of IVIG was assumed to be caused by the reduction of myelinotoxic substances, the development of antimyelinantibodies, and the promotion of remyelination. In conclusion, IVIG appear to be a promising therapeutic option in CPM. (+info)

12/105. Parkinsonism after correction of hyponatremia with radiological central pontine myelinolysis and changes in the basal ganglia.

Parkinsonism has been rarely described following central pontine and extrapontine myelinolysis. We report a case of parkinsonism developing following rapid correction ofhyponatremia with radiological evidence of central pontine myelinolysis and changes in the basal ganglia. A 56-year-old man developed drooling and bilateral hand tremors 3 weeks after correction of hyponatremia from 103 to 125 mmol/L over 14 h. He had a prominent 6 Hz resting tremor which worsened with action and mild cogwheel rigidity.magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed changes consistent with central pontine myelinolysis and increased signal on T1-weighted images in the putamen bilaterally. Histremor responded well to L-dopa therapy. There have been several other cases of parkinsonism developing after central pontine/extrapontine myelinolysis. Increased signal in the basal ganglia on T1-weighted images has been described in another case of central pontine myelinolysis imaged about the same time after sodium correction as our case.(+info)

13/105. Central pontine myelinolysis: association with parenteral magnesium administration.

A 29-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus and nephrotic syndrome was given 30 g ofmagnesium sulfate over 14 hours after a cesarian section. Her serum magnesium level increased to 7.4 mg/dl. Five days later, she became quadriplegic with inability to speak or swallow. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated central pontine myelinolysis (CPM). Initial serum sodium was not measured. Although CPM is usually associated with a rapid increase in serum osmolality, most patients who experience a rapid increase inserum osmolality do not develop the clinical syndrome of CPM. Consequently, additional factors may also be important in the pathogenesis of CPM. Parenteral magnesium administration may be a potential contributing factor in the pathogenesis of some cases of CPM. (+info)

14/105. Central pontine myelinolysis: delayed changes on neuroimaging.

The authors report two cases, a 44-year-old woman and a 6-year-old girl who had mental status changes and hyponatremiaserum sodium levels in both of these cases were corrected quickly with further decline in their mental status, and the patients became quadriparetic. magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies performed then did not reveal any abnormalities, whereas a repeat imaging study performed 10-14 days after the shift inserum sodium revealed evidence for central pontine myelinolysis and extrapontine demyelination. The clinical manifestations and distribution of lesions seen on the imaging studies demonstrated that the above presentation of neurologic illness is the result ofhyponatremia and its correction. The authors conclude that imaging studies performed early during the illness may be unremarkable, but still a diagnosis of central pontine myelinolysis should be suspected and, most importantly, a repeat imaging study might be required in 10-14 days to establish the diagnosis of central pontine myelinolysis. (+info)

15/105. methylphenidate treatment of neuropsychiatric symptoms of central and extrapontine myelinolysis.

OBJECTIVE: Previous reports describe the presentation and course of theneurobehavioral manifestations of central and extrapontine myelinolysis; as of yet, however, there are no specific recommendations for treatment of these problems. We offer the first report of successful treatment. METHOD: We describe a 55-year-old man with chronic alcoholism who developed central and extrapontine myelinolysis following an episode of heavy drinking and rapid correction of hyponatremia. The patient acutely developed motor, cognitive, emotional and behavioral problems best accounted for by central pontine and bilateral striatal myelinolysis. These neuropsychiatric symptoms were treated with methylphenidate over the course of 1 month in an off-on-off-on fashion. The Neuropsychiatric Inventory and other tests were used to assess treatment response. RESULTS: Marked improvements in the patient’s neuropsychiatric status were noted only during treatment with methylphenidate. CONCLUSIONS: methylphenidate effectively reversed the neuropsychiatric symptoms associated with the patient’s demyelinating lesions. We discuss possible underlying mechanisms of both symptom formation and treatment effect. (+info)

16/105. Slowly progressive dystonia following central pontine and extrapontine myelinolysis.

A 28-year-old woman was hospitalized with dysarthria and oro-mandibular and upper limb dystonia. Approximately 8 years prior to the current admission, the woman became severely hyponatremic due to traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage-related SIADH. brainMRIs showed a signal increase in the central ponsthalamus and striatum on T2 weighted images compatible with central pontine and extrapontine myelinolysis. From a few months after that event, dystonia progressed slowly over the subsequent 8 years. We speculate that the particular damage chiefly to the myelin structures by myelinolytic process may have caused an extremely slow plastic reorganization of the neural structures, giving rise to progressive dystonia. (+info)

17/105. Central and extrapontine myelinolysis in a patient in spite of a careful correction of hyponatremia.

We report the case of a 54-year-old alcoholic female patient who was hospitalized for neurologic alterations along with a severe hyponatremia (plasma Na+: 97 mEq/l). She suffered from potomania and was given, a few days before admission, a thiazide diuretic for hypertension. A careful correction of plasma Na+ levels was initiated over a 48-hour period (rate of correction < 10 mEq/l/24h) in order to avoid brain demyelination. After a 2-day period of clinical improvement, her neurologic condition started to deteriorate. By the 5th day of admission, she became tetraplegic, presented pseudobulbar palsyataxia, strabism, extrapyramidal stiffness and clouding of consciousness. Scintigraphic and MRI investigations demonstrated pontine and extrapontine lesions associated with Gayet-wernicke encephalopathy. After correction of ionic disorders (hyponatremia, hypokaliemia) and vitamin B (thiamine) deficiency, the patient almost completely recovered without notable disabilities. This case illustrates that profound hyponatremia, in a paradigm of slow onset, can be compatible with life. It also demonstrates that demyelinating lesions, usually considered as a consequence of a too fast correction ofhyponatremia, may occur despite the strict observance of recent guidelines. There is increasing evidence to suggest that pontine swelling and dysfunction may sometimes occur in alcoholic patients even in absence of disturbance in plasma Na+ levels. It is therefore of importance, while managing a hyponatremic alcoholic patient, to identify additional risk factors (hypokaliemia, hypophosphoremia, seizure-induced hypoxemia,malnutrition with vitamin b deficiency) for brain demyelination and to correct them appropriately. (+info)

18/105. Central pontine myelinolysis.

Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM), a neurologic disorder caused most frequently by rapid correction of hyponatremia, is characterized by demyelination that affects the central portion of the base of the pons. There are no inflammatory changes, and blood vesselsare normal. Clinical features usually reflect damage to the descending motor tracts and include spastic tetraparesis, pseudobulbar paralysis, and the locked-in syndrome.magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, the imaging procedure of choice, shows an area of prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation in the central pons, which may have a characteristic shape. Recovery varies, ranging from no improvement to substantial improvement. To avoid CPM, correction of serum sodium in patients with hyponatremia should not exceed 12 mEq/24 h. We describe a case of CPM in a hyponatremic patient who presented with a cerebellar syndrome with no pyramidal tract involvement and in whom the rate of correction of serum sodium was within the recommended limits. (+info)

19/105. Reversible central pontine and extrapontine myelinolysis in a 16-year-old girl.

A rare case of an osmotic demyelination syndrome in a 16-year-old girl is presented. MRI in the acute stage revealed a focal abnormal signal within the basis pontis and both caudate nuclei and putamina. Two years later brain lesions had disappeared on T1- and T2-weighted imaging, indicating that central pontine and extrapontine myelinolysis may be completely reversible. (+info)

20/105. Decreased diffusion in central pontine myelinolysis.

Two patients with central pontine myelinolysis (CPM) were studied with diffusion-weighted MR imaging 1 week after onset of tetraplegia. In both patients, affected white matter showed hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images associated with a decrease in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. In one patient studied serially, ADC values normalized by 3 weeks after tetraplegia. Early in the clinical course, diagnosis of CPM can sometimes be difficult. Hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted images may therefore have diagnostic utility. Decreased lesional ADC values support the notion that CPM is a consequence of relative intracellular hypotonicity. (+info)

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