Hyponatremia and Central Pontine Myelinolysis

What is hyponatremia? Information regarding CPM and EPM.

Additional symptoms related to CPM:

 

I’ve previously described movement issues like dystonia, Parkinson like tremors, other tremors, and random jerking movements, but this is something I have not heard about previously, choreic.

I had no idea what the word meant or what it is related to before a few days ago, so please feel free to add any input you might have about it.

 

The dictionary definition is: “An involuntary spasmodic twitching or jerking in muscle groups not associated with the production of definite purposeful movements.”

The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Basically, these movements are involuntary movements and jerks, so I guess in a way, I have discussed this issue before. I have jerks a lot.
If I get really stressed there seems to be this movement that my left leg does. It’s weird, and if I every experience it for a long period, I will upload a video of it. It really feels like I should have control of it. It seems ridiculous that I can’t, but it’s like my body has a mind of its own and this is one thing that I never had an issue with before. It really bugs me, but others don’t seem to notice. I guess some might consider it a  nervous tic.
I believe that the following videos really do what the motions are like for those who have these types of jerks.
This is kind of what I have experienced, so I’m posting it. I don’t have issues with my face so much as I do with kind of a rolling to my left and a rocking of my left leg and rolling of my body. It  really seems like I’m jittery or nervous or can’t sit still.  I don’t experience it very often and the periods that I go through are brief. I believe this is a positive sign.
With the following video, the little girl developed this because of scarlet fever, not huntington’s disease. She was able to recover almost completely so the following videos show her before and after:
Another good example. I believe these kind of show the extremes. Some people just seem fidgety. Others are extremely disabled.
The information that I have found has been sparse when it comes to directly attributing these choreic movements to CPM/EPM. However, it has been documented. It may not be an immediate appearing symptoms. In some cases it did not appear until months after CPM/EPM was first diagnosed. I have read that this in not an uncommon theme regarding EPM. It seems that movement disorders with EPM can appear months after the injury. I really noticed my issue develop at a doctor’s appointment. I was becoming extremely agitated, and I realized that my left kept moving as well as my left shoulder. I kept crossing and uncrossing my leg as well as moving in my chair. I’ve noticed those movements at other times of stress.
Thankfully, I don’t think it is getting worse for me.
The following information is a chart that describes that chorea can be caused by electrolyte issues:
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1998;65:436-445 doi:10.1136/jnnp.65.4.436

  • Review: Neurology and medicine

Dystonia and chorea in acquired systemic disorders

Table 6

Metabolic aetiologies of dystonia and chorea

Hyperthyroidism
Hypocalcaemia (hypoparathyroidism)
Hypoglycaemia
Hyperglycaemia
Hypernatraemia
Hyponatraemia
Hypomagnesaemia
Osmotic demyelination syndrome (central pontine myelinolysis)
Splenorenal shunt

 

Literature also seems to suggest that these reasons that these choreic movements occur is because of injury the putanem or basal ganglia. It suggests that there is a decreased amount of GABA, and there there are issues with Dopamine and glutamate.

Frankly, folks, I simply can’t read through this very detailed information from the following journal link, but it goes into great explanation why both dystonia and chorea are found in a variety of brain damage injuries, including CPM/EPM, Huntington’s disease, and many others.

Here is the quote:

As discussed earlier, dystonia and chorea most commonly result from striatal dysfunction, and hypoxia-ischaemia has been shown to alter several neurotransmitter systems in the striatum. Glutamate is the main neurotransmitter in cortical neurons projecting to the striatum and may contribute excitotoxic injury. Hypoxia-ischaemia has been shown to increase striatal extracellular glutamate, and decrease glutamate transporter concentrations. Direct lesioning of the globus pallidus with excitatory amino acids in monkeys produces cocontraction of opposing muscle groups on reaching, as in dystonia.9Extracellular dopamine concentrations rise and concentrations of dopamine metabolites fall after hypoxia-ischaemia.710Dopamine may also potentiate the excitotoxic properties of glutamate, and depleting the striatum of dopamine before hypoxia-ischaemia decreases the degree of striatal injury. In the neonatal rat model of cerebral hypoxia-ischaemia, striatal D1 and D2 dopamine receptor numbers fluctuate until 9 to 11 weeks after injury, at which time the D1 receptor number has returned to normal but the reduction in D2 receptors persists.11 Hypoxia-ischaemia also results in areas of complete loss of preproenkephalin mRNA in the dorsal striatum of the rat brain.12 Enkephalin, together with GABA, is an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the projections from the putamen to the external pallidum. Hypoxic-ischaemic necrosis of medium sized spiny striatal neurons may be responsible for decreased concentrations of the inhibitory neurotransmitter, GABA. By contrast, the striatal cholinergic system remains relatively preserved or even upregulated after hypoxia-ischaemia, as evidenced by an increase in cholinergic fibres and cell bodies, and an increase in acetylcholine release.13This is interesting in that anticholinergic medications often ameliorate dystonic movements.

http://jnnp.bmj.com/content/65/4/436.full

J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1998;65:436-445 doi:10.1136/jnnp.65.4.436

  • Review: Neurology and medicine

Dystonia and chorea in acquired systemic disorders

I will try to add more to this post in the future if I can, but right now, I can’t. Please feel free to leave questions or suggestions as you like.

 

Have a great night 🙂

 

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